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A Wrinkle in Time at 50

This book is now 50 years old!  Amazing.  I first read it in 4th Grade and it quickly became my favorite book as a child.  It had so much in it – science fiction, a love of liberty and individuality, an appreciation of learning, the need for the good to fight evil, and the possibility of victory.  Over the years, I have read and reread the book at different points in my life, always gaining something new from it.  Once I developed libertarian ideas, I looked back on the book with special fondness because it showed that I had valued these themes even as a child.

I would strongly recommend this – for your children and for yourself (whatever your age).

A real gem!

Reader Discussion

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on September 27, 2012 at 10:25:05 am

I agree that is a fantastic book. Unlike you, I only listened to the audiobook one time, but the image (was it in this book?) of the children looking back at the Earth and seeing the struggle between good and evil as light versus darkness remains a very powerful influence on my thinking. Madeline l'Engle's books are just great to get children to really exercise their grey matter.

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Jayne
on September 28, 2012 at 21:15:46 pm

I remember the book from fourth grade too. It was great. I vaguely remember that stars (the bright things in the sky) had personalities, and people could make machines crank out whatever food the people wanted.

Madeleine L'Engle was right up there with E.B. White as an author of books primarily for children.

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Andrew

Law & Liberty welcomes civil and lively discussion of its articles. Abusive comments will not be tolerated. We reserve the right to delete comments - or ban users - without notification or explanation.