fbpx

Conference on Richard Epstein’s The Classical Liberal Constitution

Last Monday, a conference was held at NYU on Richard Epstein’s new book The Classical Liberal Constitution.  Epstein’s book is in some sense his magnum opus — at least as to constitutional law — setting forth in 700 pages his classical liberal view of the Constitution and its development.  It is a beautiful book and well worth reading.

My presentation at the conference discussed whether the book could be classified as following an originalist methodology.  I conclude that it cannot.  The entire conference is available on video.  For the panel I participated in see, here.  (I start talking at the 30 minute mark.)

For the other two panels, see here and here.

Reader Discussion

Law & Liberty welcomes civil and lively discussion of its articles. Abusive comments will not be tolerated. We reserve the right to delete comments - or ban users - without notification or explanation.

on February 15, 2014 at 12:30:12 pm

Michael--

Thank you for bringing this book to my attention. It looks like a powerful piece of scholarship--I look forward to reading it, when Amazon prime does its useful trick and delivers it . . .

All best,
Kevin

read full comment
Image of Kevin R. Hardwick
Kevin R. Hardwick

Law & Liberty welcomes civil and lively discussion of its articles. Abusive comments will not be tolerated. We reserve the right to delete comments - or ban users - without notification or explanation.

Related

A Jeffersonian Proposal for the Constitution

In the interest of starting a discussion about constitutional purpose, Sandy Levinson argues "We best honor the Framers, then, by exhibiting their own willingness to challenge the verities of their times and to cease our own often “blind veneration” for the Constitution they created. What has been long settled may not be subject to conversations about “meaning,” but it is surely past time that it be analyzed for its wisdom in a 21st century America." But, what we might ask, has been settled, and what is open for re-creation?