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Law & Liberty’s Top Ten Posts of 2018

We are proud to present Law & Liberty‘s Top Ten posts of 2018:

1. Paging Doctor Marx, Theodore Dalrymple, January 22, 2018

The Lancet turns to Marx for wisdom in advancing public health, with predictable results.

2. France’s Psychodrama of 1968, Daniel Mahoney, May 1, 2018

Those who loathe and those who celebrate May 1968 agree it was a defining moment for Western democracy in its late modern form.

3. Leading a Worthy Life in a Scattered Time, Liberty Law Talk with Leon Kass, April 2, 2018

Law & Liberty editor Richard Reinsch hosts Leon Kass for a discussion of his latest book, Leading a Worthy Life: Finding Meaning In Modern Times.

4. Pope Francis’ Mess, Paul Seaton, April 14, 2018

Pope Francis has succeeded in making a mess for his Church, especially in his understanding of its core teachings.

5. For Judge Kavanaugh, It Must Be V for Victory, Richard M. Reinsch II, September 25, 2018

The Kavanaugh hearings showed that the will of the progressive shall not be impeded in its quest for cosmic justice.

6. “The Bubble” and the Judiciary: Is There a Solution?, Mark Pulliam, March 6, 2018

The federal judiciary has become dominated by what Glenn Harlan Reynolds calls Front-Row Kids—a credentialed elite with a prescribed resume.

7. Does Classical Liberalism Have a Foreign Policy?, John McGinnis, July 27, 2018

A foreign policy that pursues peaceful trade and self-defense aligns well with what classical liberals know about the limits of politics in general.

8. Trump, the Great De-Mythologizer, Daniel McCarthy, January 13, 2018

If there were a Cult of Trump, his supporters wouldn’t criticize him. They do—oftener and in more serious ways than George W. Bush’s fans criticized him.

9. Aristotle and the Seriousness of Politics, Fr. James V. Schall, November 16, 2018

The polity, Aristotle tells us, is where we do more than just stay alive: We are to live well, even nobly.

10. Churchill, Orwell, and Why We Admire Them, Barton Swaim, March 1, 2018

In an age of postmodern hyper-individualism, Churchill and Orwell’s advocacy of individual liberty isn’t what is most interesting about them.

Reader Discussion

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on December 28, 2018 at 10:19:03 am

“Oh what a tangled web we weave..., despite The Seamless Garment, there is a common thread-

“Thenceforth, every assault on established authority was celebrated as a victory for personal freedom and authenticity. The very ideas of a normative human nature—and of limits rooted in the order of things—were now rejected as unbearable obstacles to the new “democratic” way.”

“The soixante-huitards had announced with adolescent insouciance that “it was forbidden to forbid.” That was their motto par excellence, a revelation of their contempt for moral judgment and moral authority.”

“Caritas In Veritate; Veritas In Caritate.”

“...one must go back to the New Testament to comprehend its ultimate stakes, fidelity to Jesus Christ, and go forward to two great Church crises, the Arian heresy and the Jansenist movement, that shed light, as possible outcomes, on today’s turmoil.”

“Let Us Make man in Our Image.”

From The Beginning, every human person is Created in The Image and Likeness of God, equal in Dignity, while being complementary as a beloved son or daughter, Willed by God, The Most Holy And Undivided Blessed Trinity, worthy of Redemption, as a reflection of Love, although not yet perfected, through Salvational Love, God’s Gift of Grace and Mercy.

One must go back to Genesis, “to comprehend its ultimate stakes, fidelity to Jesus Christ, and go forward to two great Church crises, the Arian heresy and the Jansenist movement, that shed light, as possible outcomes, on today’s turmoil”, which we can know through both Faith and reason, is due to a denial of Genesis, and thus Divine Law.

There is order in Love, as there is order in Truth, for just as every element of Truth will serve to complement and thus enhance the fullness of Truth, so too, will every act of Love serve to complement and thus enhance the fullness of Love.

“Caritas In Veritate; Veritas In Caritate”, through The Unity Of The Holy Ghost, The Lord And Giver Of Life, Who Proceeds From The Eternal Love Between The Father And The Son. (Filioque)

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