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The Politics of Judicial Review: A Conversation with Keith Whittington

with Keith Whittington

One of our best scholars on constitutional interpretation and judicial power, Keith Whittington returns to Liberty Law Talk to discuss his book Repugnant Laws: Judicial Review of Acts of Congress from the Founding to the Present.

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on August 17, 2019 at 18:52:13 pm

As a paralegal student; Law & Liberty is an enormous asset. I am and have learned so much; not even classrooms taught by professor educated in law have taught me as much.

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Glen Hillebrand
on September 13, 2019 at 19:49:46 pm

Despite the standard narrative of no judicial review early on that Whittington attacks here, one can note that Charles Warren's massive history on the Court indicated otherwise, as did the John Agresto's slender book on judicial review.

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Carl Eric Scott
on November 22, 2019 at 01:18:14 am

“As contemporary judicial selection politics amplify the urgency of discussions regarding judicial activism, the Court’s legitimacy, and the relationship between party and judicial office, Whittington’s study reminds readers that the Supreme Court has long acted as a nation-builder and an arm of the national state, operating within partisan politics. In stressing ‘the conditional quality of judicial independence,’ Whittington offers the counsel of perspective on our current era of partisan polarization and strained inter-branch relations.” — Nancy Maveety, author of

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Law & Liberty welcomes civil and lively discussion of its articles. Abusive comments will not be tolerated. We reserve the right to delete comments - or ban users - without notification or explanation.