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An Invitation to the Land of Hope: A Conversation with Bill McClay

with Wilfred M. McClay

The award-winning American historian Bill McClay returns to Liberty Law Talk to discuss his latest book, Land of Hope: An Invitation to the Great American Story.

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on September 04, 2019 at 11:57:31 am

[…] McClay talks with Richard Reinsch about his new book, Land of Hope. An Invitation to the Land of Hope: A Conversation with Bill McClay syndicated from […]

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Image of An Invitation to the Land of Hope: A Conversation with Bill McClay | Best Legal Services
An Invitation to the Land of Hope: A Conversation with Bill McClay | Best Legal Services
on September 12, 2019 at 07:44:32 am

[…] American Story author Wilfred M. McClay made some telling remarks, almost in passing, during his recent appearance on the Liberty Law Talk podcast hosted by Law & Liberty editor Richard M. Reinsch II. Don’t let them pass. They might have […]

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Image of Notes on the freedom given Wilfred McClay to write his latest book - Philanthropic Giving
Notes on the freedom given Wilfred McClay to write his latest book - Philanthropic Giving
on September 29, 2019 at 11:04:50 am

Mr McClay asserts that the "Brexit vote happened because a significant number of Britons had come to fear that they were losing the means and the capacity for self-rule. " Assertion does not make fact. Opinion polls in January 2016 suggested that no more than 10 per cent of the respondents regarded that EU membership was a matter of concern, good or bad. Then, in the course of the referendum campaigned, the impact of six years of austerity on the health service became an issue. It was falsely claimed, emblazoned on the side of a campaign bus, by Boris Johnson and his ilk that billions of pounds of money would become available to the National Health Service almost immediately on departure from the EU. Fear of non-white immigration, which has been part of the dog whistle politics of the UKIP win of the Tories, which has been of concern to many voters was brought to the fore although the population of the EU countries is overwhelmingly white. The spectre of Turkey joining the EU and potentially over-running Britain with 90 million non-whites taking advantage of the free movement of citizens to seek employment or set up means of self-employment, enshrined in the terms of the single market, was raised. Paradoxically, some of those like Nigel Farage who raised the issue of immigration appeared to suggest that leaving the EU would allow the UK to seek out better-than-EU-origin immigrants from around the world. Then the slogan of taking back control over immigration, instead of having to accept job seekers from the EU, began to get traction. Exactly which of these arguments contributed to the Brexit vote is not possible to ascertain. It is likely that all of these and more contributed in various measures to the Brexit vote.

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S P Chakravarty

Law & Liberty welcomes civil and lively discussion of its articles. Abusive comments will not be tolerated. We reserve the right to delete comments - or ban users - without notification or explanation.