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A Republican Party After Trump?

The recent election offered voters a chance to correct Donald Trump, and they took it. But it also left the Republican Party in disarray, and in a way, showed that there isn’t a party to speak of anymore—at least not in the sense of an organized coalition of like-minded political actors with a defined policy approach. There was no policy agenda proposed by the Republicans. Instead, we have a chaotic assembly of people, an anti-party really, who combine some mixture of anxiety for the future and disdain for the Left.

At the center of this mess is Donald Trump. The election showed that while he still galvanizes some, he repels the affluent suburbanites who reluctantly voted for him in 2016. But Hillary Clinton was no longer on the ballot. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Az.) recently offered the opinion that “Trump just overwhelms and takes all of the oxygen out of the room and it’s all focused on him.” While there’s plenty of reason to criticize the source—from one primadonna to another, it seems like high praise—this only diagnoses part of the problem.

Trump offers nothing in the way of leadership. As Reihan Salam puts it, “Trump is singularly ill-equipped to drive the Republican agenda in new directions.” Apart from supplying the judicial branch with originalists, he can offer his supporters nothing but constant flashpoints in the culture war. Beyond that, it’s hard to identify much in the way of genuine policy achievement, and that has come at a steep price, particularly in affluent suburbs that overwhelmingly rejected Republican candidates in places once thought well-established bastions of conservatism.

Our president is a man defined by the desire to own the libs. But even when he’s achieved this, winning isn’t everything. As a tactic for advancing very limited goals, Trump’s tried and tested method of government-by-distraction is dishonest, and it deprives the public of an open argument about the challenges we face, and the real alternatives that we might embrace. Salam is right to say that there is a great deal of electoral potential for the GOP in “a creative and unifying new nationalism.” The Right’s old fusionism won’t do, and a permanent minority status awaits the Republicans if they cannot find a better way forward.

Although Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has received the lion’s share of media attention in the past weeks, two small indications that the Republican Party may yet find life after Trump stand out—and in particular address the issue of who will provide the ideas that will sustain a new balance of power in the party, and the moral leadership that will require.

One thing Trump does well—and that offers a key to understanding his success—is that he never assented to the premise of any attack. This is something that Republicans did all the time, and like Charlie Brown to the media (and Democrats’) Lucy, they were left at a disadvantage every time.

Enter Congressman-elect Dan Crenshaw. The subject of a bad joke on Saturday Night Live, Crenshaw now-famously departed from the usual script in these matters, and tweeted “I try hard not to offend; I try harder not to be offended.” He followed this up with a heartfelt monologue calling for national unity on Veterans’ Day and in an op-ed at the Washington Post asked readers to consider a return to public debate in good faith:

For starters, let’s agree that the ideas are fair game. If you think my idea is awful, you should say as much. But there is a difference between attacking an idea and attacking the person behind that idea. Labeling someone as an “-ist” who believes in an “-ism” because of the person’s policy preference is just a shortcut to playground-style name-calling, cloaked in political terminology. It’s also generally a good indication that the attacker doesn’t have a solid argument and needs a way to end debate before it has even begun.

This isn’t idle talk: on Sunday, Crenshaw sparred with a panel of recently-elected Democrats on Meet the Press, asking for arguments rather than labels, and offering some of his own.

In a recent essay for The Atlantic, Representative Mike Gallagher (R-Wis.) offered up a warning at the end of his first term in the House: Congress is in much worse shape than most of the public realizes. Gallagher tells a tale of disillusionment: He came to Congress believing that the issue with the body was the people, and two years later, has reached the conclusion that the problem is institutional.

Unfortunately, a structural problem is harder to fix than a people problem. In the House of Representatives, we have an opportunity to get rid of bad people every two years via elections. Reforming the legislative process and realigning incentives is more difficult. The reality is that Congress cannot get anything done because it is not equipped to get anything done. It is no longer a tool suited to its original purpose of making laws and providing oversight. It has instead become a theater used by both parties to stoke the outrage of their base.

Gallagher offers several suggestions for reform and a touch of humor, and anyone interested in practical ways to restore Congress to its proper place as an equal branch of government ought to read it and hope he finds supporters.

If the Republican Party finds its way past the Trump-inflicted losses of November 6 and those to come, it will be politicians like these that accomplish it. I say this not because of any particular policy they embrace—at first glance, they may well be opposed on a number of issues.

Bringing voters back will require something more than just the right policies: The task demands virtues that Trump’s immediate circle does not appreciate. Politicians will need to be willing to have serious arguments within the party and with the Democrats—and demonstrate the ability to compromise. Such a project needs leaders that can engage the public’s attention without prompting a culture war at every tweet. And to win back affluent suburbanites, Republican leaders absolutely require the good humor that both Crenshaw and Gallagher display.

They and other-like minded members of Congress might open up paths previously closed. They could press for reforms like those Gallagher proposes, ones that might reinvigorate Congress as a co-equal branch. Both have signaled a willingness to discuss and debate issues with their opponents, and this is an important start. They accept that political conflict is an essential part of our system in a way that many before them did not, and they model the ways that one can offer real opposition to the Left without surrendering to Trump’s odious style.

Reader Discussion

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on November 21, 2018 at 08:02:52 am

This election was about the republicans in congress once again betraying the people who put them there to repeal Obamacare, put up a wall, and reduce spending. As usual they LIED ! They had seven years to think about how to repeal Obamacare and when they got what they begged for, they looked like a deer in the headlights. People see this weakness and reject it.

Don't blame Trump for their losing the house, that is on their own HEADS !

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Jim Lewis
on November 21, 2018 at 08:23:38 am

Smith's stuff is yada, yada, yada; shallow repetition of bland media truisms signifying nothing but that the crypto-Progressive Bush and McCain Republicans are still around to torment us.

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 21, 2018 at 09:23:50 am

Yesterday, I got a call from the GOP asking for money. The party of Trump, they said. I'm not interested in being in The Party of Trump. So when the telemarketer asked if they could again count on us for donations of hundreds of dollars, I said "No." and hung up.

I'm not a Democrat. I am no longer comfortably a Republican, though I voted only for Republicans this month in the midterm. Trump, you guys, above, need people like me, Republicans like me, in order to win elections. How do you ignore the fact? In 2020, the Democrats will probably settle the matter of a second term by running someone like Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, or even Cory Booker. We'll again have no choice. It's not as if they have anyone moderate enough to appeal to disaffected Republicans who their party would support. They'll have the rest of us loathing their candidate enough to vote for Trump again, who we'll prefer on policy terms, if not on personal ones.

But that's not what Mr. Smith is talking about, really. His point is about the problem within the House that leaves it unable to legislate well even when a majority is Republican, with a Republican Senate and a Republican president. Part of that problem is the war within our own party, which is the nature of The Party of Trump that people like me find anathema.

People like Crenshaw and Gallagher offer us hope for what the party might look after Trump's career is done. I mean, assuming they are not hounded out of politics and the party by Trump or his supporters. Really, you guys are the RINOs. Trump first, republican principles second or not at all. How is that ever going to be a viable party?

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Kate Pitrone
on November 21, 2018 at 09:24:34 am

What, exactly, is the raison d'etre for the Republican Party? If Republicans believe that it's government's job to "solve problems," then they are really Democrats. If American voters will reject Republicans who reject continued increases in federal spending--spending of money we don;t have but must continually re-borrow--then what need is there for a second party at all? The Democrats appear to have dragged the American electorate to the left over a period of many decades and the GOP has done nothing to prevent that. If the Republicans won't use their majority power when they have it to radically deconstruct the administrative state, why are they even there?

Trump is truly a change from the status quo ante and that is why he is loathed across both parties. But he is just a temporary suspension of the de facto evolution of the One-Party State in this country. I really can think of no substantial reason for the Republican Party.

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QET
on November 21, 2018 at 10:15:56 am

After belonging to the GOP since the mid 60's I have decided it no longer speaks for me. My faith in it's leadership has been swaying for a number of years but the nomination and election of Donald Trump was the breaking point.

Draining the swamp consist of more than killing a few mosquitoes. It involves having morals, ideas and a vision of where you want to take the party. The "Greatest Deliberating Body" no longer deliberates as shown by a Pew Research Center study the 115th Congress has passed the fewest MEANINGFUL legislation in 30 years. The GOP now stands for "Gutless On Principles" as shown by their refusal to run on any ideas or campaign promises during the 2018 midterm election except the fear and anger of caravan and Kavanaugh. I can only suppose they believe they don't need to make promises when in the past running on "the lesser of two evils' has proven successful. Well it no longer works. Once malice is embraced and you advocate a bunker mentality through tribalism you achieve a polarized nation not greatness.

The Conservative movement that once prided itself on the intellectual rigors of Kirk, Hayek, Weaver, Buckley and Freidman now looks to the feces throwing tweets of an intellectual idiot that demeans the country, the office and himself. The Republican party has become parasitic enablers by ignoring his demeaning behavior because of fear of inflaming his supporters. Through errors of omission, inadvertent inattention, willful disregard and deliberate distortions they have aided and abetted this garbage fire of an administration in it's feckless acts. Oh there has been occasional words of protest but seldom has there been any "Profiles in Courage" by any follow up deeds.

It is not despair to be excommunicated from this miasma it is civility and a justified divorce. I will continue to stand athwart Trumps demagoguery yelling stop !

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Bob Manderville
on November 21, 2018 at 10:45:10 am

Well we could always go back to Bush politics, a little soft touch never hurt, unless of course we can hide from the thugs that have emerged of late. Best to borrow a bit of toughness, venom never hurt and the shock of strength might shock the tender among us.

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johnt
on November 21, 2018 at 11:47:27 am

In my humble opinion, after watching politicians for decades we have to recognize that there truly are not many patriots who try to serve the nations best interests. They are interested...first and foremost...in remaining in power. Second, and only by the thinnest margin, is the desire to accumulate personal wealth. As a Texan, I marveled at LBJ’s ability to accumulate massive wealth with only “public service” as a career. Ditto the Clintons. And probably a bunch I don’t know about. What to do? Hell if I know. But we would do well to find more people like Senator Harry Byrd of Virginia who killed a bill even though it would have favored his business as a farmer because it was bad for the country.

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Jimbrock
on November 21, 2018 at 12:00:08 pm

HaHa the rhetoric!
And with faux-conservatives "to stand athwart Trump's demagoguery yelling stop" who needs Democrats to destroy the country?

What's wrong with America, the source of its existential crisis, is patently simple, yet Smith's useless essay both fails to discuss the problem and would subvert the corrective: 1) The K-16 education oligarchy, Silicon Valley's mega-rich, the news media, Hollywood and the entertainment industry (all of which control the propaganda technology that shapes the American mind) possess and reflect the intellectually-defective, politically-confused, economically- crass and self-serving values of John McCain, W. Bush, the Clintons, Barack Obama, George Soros, Jeff Bezos, the Business Roundtable, Nancy Pelosi and "Chuck U" Schumer, in sad consequence of which 2) a majority of voters (Democrat and Republican combined) now possess those same defective materialistic values and consumerist principles in defense of which they are prepared to run widely afoul of the legal constraints of the Founders' constitution and to jettison the moral/political vision of the Founding, while 3) the vast majority of conservatives embrace the constitutional and moral/political values of the Founders and possess the political vision of Russell Kirk, Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan. These stodgy conservatives (not the ubiquitous, vociferous, self-serving faux-conservatives like the two Georges, Will and Bush) have found an ironic defender, the libertine Donald Trump, who (having experienced, it would seem, his road to Damascus conversion) actually fights valiantly (and indefatigably) to preserve and defend their conservative values which, ironically, are now the values espoused by a socially isolated, "discrete and insular minority" (in the words of Carolene Products' infamous footnote 4) that is invidiously mistreated by the nation at large yet championed by Donald Trump in particular (who woulda thunk it.)

The former group, the alliance of liberal Democrat-Republicans, is much larger than the latter group, the constitutional conservatives, and is, as well, far more powerful and, animated by social justice warriors and self-righteous anger, far more aggressive in fighting to preserve its extraordinary wealth, near-totalitarian power and unwarranted special privilege.

The prospect for a happy ending is slim.

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 21, 2018 at 12:33:48 pm

Here's a thought shared with me many, many years ago vis-a-vis your candidate offerings: when magnified by partisan rhetoric, the difference between the parties appear worrisome enough to induce millions of citizens to vote - if not "for" then "against" someone. This lesser-of-two-evils appeal is the single most effective inducement to voter participation and is a marvelous ruling-class device. The people are offered a candidate who violates their interests and then they are presented with another candidate who promises to be even worse. Fundamentally, the voters (people) are not so much "offered" a choice as "forced" into one. (My apology this reply intended for Kate Pitrone - I realized after completion that I'm on wrong reply line and chose not to retype)

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Anthony
on November 21, 2018 at 13:48:50 pm

Agreed. Much better to lose the war with Gen'l McClellan -- who at least knows how to behave at our salons -- at the head of the armies, than to win it with that horrible, uncouth fellow Grant. Not our sort, dear...not our sort at all.

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Longstreet's Grumpy Shade
on November 21, 2018 at 13:50:58 pm

The members of the current day Congress consist of self serving ,situational ethics and morally impotent politicians. They have become paralyzed by risk aversion or influenced by party and outside donations instead of adhering to their Constitutional duties. They no longer believe they are there to be "Checks and Balances' against the other two branches of government as stipulated in the Constitution but as active arms of their perspective parties and therefore checks and balances against the other party. This ideology leads to both parties becoming different wings of the same predatory bird.

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Bob Manderville
on November 21, 2018 at 15:39:43 pm

Lincoln found a fighter in four years; Republican conservatives were in the leadership wilderness from 1989-2016, so long that its officer corps now resembles Confederates.

BTW: Trump-like harsh rhetoric, sharp humor and sarcasm, even as to one's mortal enemies, is strictly forbidden among the felicitous, fat-with-prosperity Skull and Crossbones types, Wall Street big bottom banker boys and other self-serving, self-satisfied country club Republicans for whom the false civility of "get along-go along" is, it seems, a habit learned like table manners and a symbol of their undue power, exorbitant wealth and special privilege.

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 21, 2018 at 19:17:01 pm

Thank you, Anthony. That's true and most Republicans I know voted for Trump on that basis, including my husband. If not for Jim Comey basically telling the nation that she had behaved criminally, I probably would have voted for Trump in a state of self-disgust. After that, sure she'd lose, I voted my conscience for president, which was for no one.

I'm voting location manager on election days in a local precinct and I have never had so many voters telling me some variation on "I can't believe what I'm about to do!". My first election as poll worker was 1988. In 28 years, I've never heard dismay like that. But it did get out the vote. We had a great turnout.

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Kate Pitrone
on November 21, 2018 at 19:33:06 pm

America lost the war against collectivism decades ago. Since Wilson basically all 10 Planks to the Communist Manifesto (albeit in modified form) has been inserted into the American fabric. The Income Tax,Inheritance Tax,Central Banking,Public Education,etc. all spring from the womb of socialism. In the 1st half of the 20th Century the Conservatives,some Democrats and most Republicans fought tooth and nail to stop this incremental march toward collectivism,but to no avail. The last real chances to stop the tide of collectivism was with Taft in 52' and Goldwater in 64'. Both never got near the White House. Today,it is obvious to any critical thinker that the real power in America is the 4th Branch of government popularly known as the "Deep State" or Administrative State. The Republican Party,consists mostly of "me too" and "socialist light" politicians who "go along to get along" with their Democrat rivals. And,as it turns out there is not much real difference in the parties,at least on a national level. The fact is that the real conservatives have migrated over to the Libertarian Party. Of course a lot of people say that voting for a 3rd Party is a wasted vote. I say that I would rather vote for someone that I want and not get them elected then vote for someone I don't want and see them elected. After all,the lesser of two evils is still evil. As mentioned earlier,the "Deep State" controls things by holding dossiers on all major elected politicians,whether Republican or Democrat. If the politician doesn't do what the Deep State desires that is when the intimidation shows up.

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libertarian jerry
on November 21, 2018 at 21:04:10 pm

Is there a philosophical basis here, or simply anti-Trump? I am not enthusiastic about the current situation, but I am getting about 50% decent stuff right now, whereas Hillary would have provided zilch. I refuse to let Trump ruin my life.

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Duane Oyen
on November 22, 2018 at 13:15:56 pm

Correct. Why vote for a deceptive RINO when you can vote for a REAL Democrat?

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OldLawProf
on November 22, 2018 at 16:35:26 pm

Well said, Grumpy!

"Not our sort, dear…not our sort at all."

This is akin to, and as successful as those *gentleman* politicians and statesmen who claimed that "Gentlemen do not read other gentleman's mail."

Thank God, some of us are NOT gentlemen and we have no problem with reading the "mail" of our enemies.

As some other commenter phrased it earlier in the week:
We don;t need "pompous dandies" giving us a problem we don;t have.

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Guttenburgs Press and Brewery
on November 22, 2018 at 23:55:00 pm

Let's remember several things. (1) We are going to get a lot more federal judges because Trump was effective in expanding the Senate majority. What would we be looking at in the Supreme Court if those holy'er than thou Republicans that backed Hillary were successful? (2) The Senate majority can block crazy liberal legislation coming from the House. (3) If the House Dem's go off on a witch hunt that will backfire just as it did on the Republicans in Obama's first term. (4) The economy is growing because of the reduction in regulations and red tape.(5) Trump will eventually get the southern border closed to illegals if congress can get its act together. (5) Trump is correct in calling out the judiciary for being political. Roberts is unbelievable criticizing Trump when he made up language in Obamacare in order to uphold it. Can you get more political than that? I think not. (6) What is the effect of 98% negative coverage of Trump in the MSM? Compare that with 98% positive coverage of Obama. Republican must focus on the positive. Ask yourself, do you prefer Trump policies and Trump's lack of decorum, or Hillary policies and Hillary's decorum? I'll take Trump every time!!!!

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Edward Speegle
on November 23, 2018 at 08:52:45 am

All true, all indisputable re Trump.

But it misses the ESSENTIAL grievances of the Never-Trumpers, that he is not one of their political/economic class, that they did not create him, that they do not control him, that he is not beholden to their political/economic class and that Trump's very political existence is embarrassing proof of the failure of their political/economic class.

Thus, they cannot forgive Trump his original sin, that he is not of, by and for them.

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 23, 2018 at 10:43:20 am

"Thus, they cannot forgive Trump his original sin, that he is not of, by and for them."

And here is the interesting thing.

It is quite conceivable that if handled properly The Trumpster could forge a new and more responsive and resilient Republican Party. A Party that seeks to include the working men and women of this nation, that is cognizant of the threats to their economic / cultural well being, that is less concerned with the overly ambitious and dystopian objectives of the global elite cadres with their self serving platitudes, i.e., free trade, no-borders, low wages all in pursuit of ever greater *human integration* while simultaneously assuring higher profit margins and ever growing influence (both political and social).

It is not simply that The Trumpster is not OF them; it is that they that which he is a part of - workers, builders, etc. For all the Never Trumpers talk of concern over the effects of economic policies on American workers, a) they don't give a damn about the effects and would rather that some *mythical* regime of Free Trade prevail, no doubt to satisfy some deep seated pyschological need to maintain their ideological Gestalt, b) they actually FEAR working people, with their untidy manners, speech and fuzzy (according to them) thinking and c) they fear the loss of their exalted status as "conservative" public intellectuals were the curtains to be opened and we were to find "little men" in funny eyeshades attempting to control the levers of some "Rube Goldberg" economic / intellectual engine.

The GOP would be far stronger were it to ACTUALLY listen and respond to the concerns, hopes and ambitions of america's working men and women. Perhaps, only then, can the BIG LIE, propagated for well nigh a century and a half by the Democrat Party, that the Democrats are the Party of the Working Man, finally be proven false.

But as I say, the Country Club Gentlemen can not abide the likes of deplorables such as I, and millions similarly positioned / inclined. Instead, they would have us remain quiescent, provided with a daily dose of *SOMA* and thus sit attentively to their pronouncements.

SCREW 'EM as Anthony Hopkins exclaimed in Legends of the Fall.

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gabe
on November 23, 2018 at 10:45:06 am

Oops:

"t is not simply that The Trumpster is not OF them; it is that they that which he is a part of – workers, ..."

Should read:

t is not simply that The Trumpster is not OF them; it is that they HATE that which he is a part of – workers,

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gabe
on November 23, 2018 at 11:16:58 am

As I recall "SCREW "EM" was the best line in the movie spoken by its most morally sensitive character, Colonel Ludlow, expressing perfectly his unbounded rage at man's limitless stupidity and mindless cruelty.

How apt to deploy it against Democrats and Never-Trumpers.

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 23, 2018 at 13:51:01 pm

Absotively!

It is why I love the scene as it evokes an image of some Biblical Prophet administering long overdue justice.

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gabe
on November 23, 2018 at 16:35:52 pm

Kate:

She, that is Hillary behaved *criminally* not just badly.

As to "choice", Trump was not my first choice. I preferred Ted Cruz. However, given the proclivities and tendencies of the Clintons to curry favor, and I might add massive amounts of "donations" from the International power set determined to minimize State sovereignty in pursuit of their globalist, One-World aims, which incidentally accrue to their own financial and status / power advantage, one would not be too hard pressed to read that Hillary Clinton (as did Barack Obama) would be in full support of these comments,

https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/11/23/merkel-eu-hand-sovereignty-brussels/

recently made by another power hungry / deluded Leader, Angela Merkel of Germany in which she flatly states that the (once) sovereign nations of Europe must give up their sovereignty.
Being German, and further having been raised under the influence of an all powerful STATE, Merkel, of course, avers that this should be "done in an orderly manner."

How considerate of Ms Merkel. While you did not specifically employ the currently fashionable canard regarding Trump's "foul nationalism", you may want to recognize that many people who voted for Trump fully support, indeed, demand that the US president out America First and that they shudder at the thought of some Merkel clone, Hillary, whose past actions / statements indicate that so long as she and her Internationalist cronies and power brokers are able to maintain their power, monies and influence, US sovereignty be damned.

This would have simply taken her and her vile husband's "Play for Pay" schemes to another level.

The best thing about Hillary losing is that "donations" to the Clinton Foundation (RICO statute, anybody) are down considerably.

The worst thing about voting one's "conscience", i.e., by not voting, is that it is, and was, a vote for Hillary and the other globalists.
I would rather "hold my nose" then have to continually hold on to my wallet, my faith and my guns (yes, my guns) for dear life.

And all those Never Trumpers at NRO, First Things, etc etc may accept responsibility for some major portion of the 4 million fewer Republicans who went to the polls this past election. I would venture to say that many of those Never Trumper's actually revel in the fact that the Democrats now control the House.
How is that going to work out for your conscience and your sensibilities when the incoming Democrat Congress has repeatedly stated their intention to INVESTIGATE, INVESTIGATE, INVESTIGATE.

Talk about UNSEEMLY. I would rather have a fellow who butchers the language, who swears and returns insults than an entire Congress intent on further defiling the always "expected" political discourse, corrupting it's assigned institutional role AND the Constitution, all in pursuit of delusional, dystopian fantasies and in spite at Trump for defeating them.

Below, gabe argues that we may have all missed something: That Trump, if given support, could conceivably broaden the GOP base by listening and responding to working peoples concerns.

Some years back, didn't Peter Spiliakos, a soft Never Trumper concede this, indeed argued for it over at First Things. Just consider it at next election.

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Guttenburgs Press and Brewery
on November 23, 2018 at 18:50:34 pm

"And here is the interesting thing.
It is quite conceivable that if handled properly The Trumpster could forge a new and more responsive and resilient Republican Party. A Party that seeks to include the working men and women of this nation, "

Re your hope see the following recent post on First Things:
https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2018/11/the-rich-turn-to-the-democrats

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 23, 2018 at 22:46:39 pm

"SCHADENFREUDE !"

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Bob Manderville
on November 23, 2018 at 23:24:11 pm

"Schadenfreude" is misused and makes no sesne in the context in which you have misused it! Check your German.
Maybe weltschmerz.

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 24, 2018 at 10:20:11 am

No "Schadenfreude" describes my feelings to what you wrote perfectly !

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Bob Manderville
on November 24, 2018 at 13:58:13 pm

Oh, now I see your darkness. How naïve of me to have missed it!

As sort of ein Teufel von einem mann, you're joyful in your country's misery.
Do I have it right now?

So geht die welt zugrunde.

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Pukka Luftmensch
on November 26, 2018 at 11:40:57 am

Guttenburgs,

I don't think see the amazing benevolence of the president. I didn't see it in the last guy, either. I never thought of Pete Spiliakos as a Never Trumper. I think he's just realistic, at least most of the time.

As I said above, I preferred Trump to the alternative in 2016 and I'll probably have to vote for Trump next time, despite thinking that he'll be just as stymied in his massive change effort as he has been for the last two years. Someone less abrasive could have done more. Everything becomes about what Trump tweets and reason becomes irrelevant to the conversation. Given what he does, Congress has been more tied up than ever.

Yes, investigate, investigate, will be the theme of the next couple of years in our government. Trump will either make deals or uncover Democratic corruption through his own investigations. Frankly, I'd prefer the latter. Well probably get the latter since new Democrats were certainly not elected to compromise. A lot of reaping and sowing could happen, couldn't it?

In the midterm, as I said, I voted for Republicans all the way. So your complaint about my conscience is pointless. I live with the working class. Economically speaking, I am one of them, despite my husband's white-collar small business.

I think the midterm election ought to suggest necessary correctives to the Trumpian GOP. I see from reading responses here and other places, that probably won't happen. Too bad.

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Kate
on December 01, 2018 at 00:03:47 am

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A Republican Party After Trump? - Trump Gawker

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