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Announcing Liberty Classics

We are pleased to announce Liberty Classics, a new series engaging with Liberty Fund’s extensive catalog of books. Each essay in this series will review a major work published by Liberty Fund, with an eye to understanding their relevance of classic debates to contemporary law, politics, and culture.

We chose the first three books because of their importance for contemporary debates about originalism and liberalism:

Mark Pulliam, A Victorian Case for Ordered Liberty

James Fitzjames Stephen’s Liberty, Equality, Fraternity remains the best response to John Stuart Mill, and the politics of unfettered progress.

Stephen Presser, The Coming Resurrection of Raoul Berger? A Remembrance of Government by Judiciary

That judges are self-consciously law makers rather than law finders simply cannot be denied: Berger’s Government by Judiciary offers insight into opposing this.

Allen Mendenhall, A Better Sort of Constitutional Learning: James McClellan’s Liberty, Order, and Justice

James McClellan’s Liberty, Order, and Justice offers a wise introduction to the philosophy and politics of the U.S. Constitution.

Reader Discussion

Law & Liberty welcomes civil and lively discussion of its articles. Abusive comments will not be tolerated. We reserve the right to delete comments - or ban users - without notification or explanation.

on May 15, 2018 at 10:20:44 am

Professor Presser’s essay is a tour de force! Resurrecting classics from the Liberty Fund catalog was a brilliant idea. Those old volumes contain timeless wisdom.

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Mark Pulliam
on May 15, 2018 at 11:19:03 am

As a long term advocate of this effort to further deploy the intellectual capital of the Liberty Fund library for the vital objective of Pierre Goodrich (which might be repeated as an introduction to ever essay) one can surely be hopeful this effort will succeed.

"Each essay in this series will review a major work published by Liberty Fund, with an eye to understanding their relevance of classic debates to contemporary LAW, POLITICS, and CULTURE."

AND (we may hope) to the value of INDIVIDUAL LIBERTY ; Mr. Goodrich's objective in all that has been accumulated.

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R Richard Schweitzer
on May 15, 2018 at 11:42:22 am

It is intended to use this Fund to the end that some hopeful contribution may be made to the preservation, restoration, and development of individual liberty through investigation, research, and educational activity.

Pierre Goodrich

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R Richard Schweitzer
on May 15, 2018 at 13:34:26 pm

Excellent idea!

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Delawarean
on May 15, 2018 at 14:59:32 pm

It appears Dear Sir that the Editors have finally listened. Bully for them and Bully for you!!! (give the cat an extra treat today, HA!)

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gabe
on May 16, 2018 at 10:31:56 am

Perhaps this should have been directed by separate note to the Editors, but on reflection, it may not irritate the general readers greatly.

These exercises may, but to be effective, need not, be "reviews" or Precises of particular works.

In the now enormous corpus of the Library of Liberty in the well-ordered and fully indexed catalogue of Liberty Fund publications one finds "thinking" on matters, concepts, and events that have, and do, impact INDIVIDUAL LIBERTY.

An example could be found in an "analysis" by a scholar such as Daniel J. Mahoney of
Bernard De Jouvenal's trilogy: "Power" (LF 1993); "Sovereignty" (LF 1997); and, "The Pure Theory of Politics" (LF 1999). It would be marvellous to include his "The Ethics of Redistribution" (LF 1990), which was part of the LF "Library of the Philosophy of Liberty" {that latter libray included the work covered by Mark Pulliam above].

Of course it is valuable to share the understanding of thinking scholars of the contents of these many works, but it is doubly valuable to gain, from them, further understanding, theirs and those of the thinkers read, of the impacts on,
and development of, individual liberty.

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R Richard Schweitzer

Law & Liberty welcomes civil and lively discussion of its articles. Abusive comments will not be tolerated. We reserve the right to delete comments - or ban users - without notification or explanation.

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